Marlin Model 60 History

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In 1960, Edward Nichol designed the Marlin Glenfield Model 60 off of the Model 99 platform. The major improvements made to the Model 60 over the 99 were the transition from steel inner tubes to brass inner tubes in the tubular magazine in order to prevent rusting. The Model 60 was also grooved for tip-off scope mounts and given a different wood stock. Early models were stamped “Marlin Model 60G” (“G” for Glenfield), which was replaced in the late 1960s with “Marlin Glenfield Model 60”, on the barrel.

Most importantly the Marlin Model 60 featured a 22” grooved and rifled barrel, with Marlin’s patented Micro-Groove rifling technology. The rifling and the precision-crowned muzzle gives the Model 60 an inherent accuracy advantage over its other rimfire competitors. The Micro-Groove system doesn’t damage the actual bullet as it travels down the barrel but the competitor’s much deeper rifling grooves did.

Since the birth of the Marlin Glenfield Model 60 there have been over 11 million made to date!

  • In 1967, Marlin introduced the Glenfield Model 70 which is very similar to the Model 60 except that it uses a box magazine instead of the tubular magazine.
  • In 1976, the wrap around front sight of the Model 60 with a screw on ramp sight. Around that time a compression ring was added to the magazine tube end catch.
  • Then in 1983, Marlin decided to drop the Glenfield designation along with the barrel band and stock-checkering.
  • Overall, the basic design of the Model 60 never changed much for 25 years until, in 1985; Marlin implemented a “last shot” hold open feature that holds the bolt halfway open after the last round is ejected. The Glenfield/ Marlin 60 did not come with a bolt release until 1985. Earlier productions did not have the last shot hold open feature. The only way to hold the bolt open was to pull the bolt handle back and push in. To release, pull the bolt a little further back and pull out.
  • In the late 1980s, Marlin was forced to chop the 18-round tubular magazine due to legislation that was implemented requiring a 15 round limit to meet NJ’s firearms law for semi-automatic assault weapons.
  • In 1999, the barrel length was shortened from 22” to 19”. There has also been a succession of changes to the feed throat, ejector, bolt, action side plates and the trigger guard over the years.

Marlin Model 60 Specs:

Caliber: .22LR
Magazine: 14 Round Tubular Magazine
Action: Semi-Automatic, Side Ejection, Last Shot Bolt Hold Open
Barrel: 19” with Micro-Groove rifling
Barrel Twist: 1 : 16 Right Hand Twist
Sights: Adjustable Open Rear Sights, Ramp Front Sight, Receiver Grooved for Scope Mount
Overall Length: 37.5”
Trigger Pull: Can be 3.75 lbs with the MCARBO Trigger Spring Kit for the Marlin 60

The Model 60 is currently available in 9 distinct versions:

Model 60, the basic rifle

Model 60C, the basic rifle in a camouflage version

Model 60SN, the basic rifle with a black fiberglass stock

Model 60SB, the rifle in a weather-proof stainless steel version

Model 60DL, the basic rifle in a Monte Carlo walnut stock

Model 60SS, the rifle in a nickel-plated, stainless steel version with a grey/black laminate stock

Model 60SSK, the rifle in a nickel-plated, stainless steel version, with black fiberglass stock

Model 60S-CF, the rifle in a nickel-plated, stainless steel version, with a black carbon-fiber-patterned stock

Model 60DLX, the newest Marlin 60, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Model 60, has a premium walnut stock and gold fill on the roll marks.

***Below is a reference chart to accurately determine what year your Marlin was made. This chart applies to all Non Model 39 Marlin 22’s.***

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