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How to Zero your Scope - "2 Shot System"

How to Zero your Iron Sights

A zero is the alignment of the sights with the bore of the rifle so the bullet will impact on the target at the desired point of aim. When the aim, the sights, and the bore coincide on the same point, it is called the zero. There are two zero ranges, near and actual. These are the two locations that the bullet crosses the line of sight.

Step 1: Determine your Zero Distance: 50 Meters

Firing ranges should have known distances marked by stakes, signs or lines on the ground. Be sure to note whether it is yards or meters. While the difference between yards and meters is relatively small, knowing it may save you some ammunition.

If you are using a range that is not marked, you'll have to pace, measure or laser range find the distance yourself. In this example it's 50 Meters.

Step 2: Fire 3 Round Group.
We are looking for a good tight shot group. Adjustments are made from an estimated center of the shot group.



With groups 1 & 2 we can easily determine the center of the group and make adjustments

Group 3 is a problem. You can adjust from this group, but unless the shooter tightens up, you could be zeroing for a while.

Some people like to fire a four or five round group in order to get a better approximation of where the center of the group is. That is a good technique but the target may become confusing very quickly if you don't mark your rounds well.

Step 3: Measure for Vertical Correction


Find the center of your shot
group and measure the vertical
distance to the horizontal
center line: 5 1/8 inches

Step 4: Measure for Horizontal Correction


Find the center of your shot
group and measure the horizontal
distance to the vertical
center line: 3 1/4 inches

MOA Defined:

A minute of angle (MOA) is an angular measurement equal to 1/60 of 1 degree of arc. Its size increases uniformly over the range, but its value stays the same. At 100 meters the true value of an MOA equals 1.14 inches this can be rounded down to just one inch; one MOA at 200 meters equals 2.29 inches but can be rounded down to 2 inches; and at 300 yards, three inches; and so on.

Thus a sight adjustment error of 2 inches at 100 yards becomes a 10 inch error at 500 yards and a 20 inch error at 1000 yards.

Step 5: Look up your inch or centimeter value for
your MOA/CLICK at your zero distance(Meters)

Step 6: Adjust elevation settings
Number of clicks of elevation = Measure of Vertical Correction Needed ÷ Inch or CM for your MOA/Click at your zero distance

Example: 5.125 ÷ .57 = 8.99 round to 9 clicks up.

Step 7: Adjust windage settings
Number of clicks of windage = Measure of Horizontal Correction Needed ÷ Inch or CM for your MOA/Click at your zero distance

Example: 3.25 ÷ .57 = 5.70 round up to 6 clicks to the left.

Step 8: Repeat steps 3-8 until your shot group coincides with your point of aim


Depending on your consistency you should be able to zero in 9 rounds.
3 shots to establish a reference point for adjustments.
3 shots to check the adjustment.
3 shots to confirm your zero.

If it takes more time then do it. Better to be spot on then miss opportunities at greater distances.

Number of questions: 0